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Monday, July 20, 2020 | History

4 edition of The element of irony in English literature found in the catalog.

The element of irony in English literature

Francis McDougall Charlewood Turner

The element of irony in English literature

an essay

by Francis McDougall Charlewood Turner

  • 285 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by Norwood Editions in Norwood, Pa .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Irony in literature.,
  • English literature -- History and criticism.

  • Edition Notes

    Reprint of the 1926 ed. published by the University Press, Cambridge.

    Statementby F. McD. C. Turner.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPR931 .T8 1976
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvii, 109 p. ;
    Number of Pages109
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4895449M
    ISBN 100848226208
    LC Control Number76028970
    OCLC/WorldCa2986178

    Guide to Literary Terms Homework Help Questions. Define 'Novel'. Mention some of its common features. Novel, is a word derived from the French word for new--nouvel is one form of this adjective. Irony is a linguistic and literary device, in spoken or written form, in which real meaning is concealed or contradicted. It takes two forms: verbal irony, in which literal meaning contradicts actual meaning, and dramatic irony, in which there is an incongruity between what is expected and what occurs.

    Irony results when there is a difference between what appears to be happening and what is actually happening. For example, when a character or reader expects or assumes one thing and the opposite is true, the writer has created irony. Literature and Language: English and World Literature. Evanston, Illinois: McDougal, Little & Co., , Irony Examples in Literature That are Just Perfect for a Lazy Day. Understanding a literary device like irony can only be made simple with the help of examples. There are different types of irony that are used by authors and poets to express their views without overtly stating them.

    Types of Irony. There are three central types of irony: verbal, situational, and dramatic irony. Each category applies to either reality or literature, which would depend on the context of the given statement. 1. Verbal Irony. A verbal irony comes to play when a speaker says the . translator’s perspective. It offers elements for a basic definition and for a classi-fication of literary irony. It aims to provide the literary translator with a practical framework that would make it an easier task to identify and understand the various types of irony present in literature. Irony is not a distinct and independent phenomenon.


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The element of irony in English literature by Francis McDougall Charlewood Turner Download PDF EPUB FB2

Originally published inthis book presents a concise analysis of the nature of irony in English literature, with special emphasis on 'prophetic irony'. Discussion focuses on examples taken from prose literature, with an introductory section on the meaning of : C.

Turner. Originally published inthis book was formed from the content of an essay which was awarded the Le Bas Prize for The text presents a concise analysis of the nature of irony in English literature, with special emphasis on 'prophetic irony'.

Discussion focuses on Pages:   The element of irony in English literature an essay by Francis McDougall Charlewood Turner. Published by The University Press in Cambridge [Eng.]. Written in EnglishPages:   Irony is a figure of speech in which words are used in such a way that their intended meaning is different from the actual meaning of the words.

It may also be a situation that ends up in quite a different way than what is generally anticipated. In simple words, it is a difference between appearance and reality.

Irony is a figure of speech in which the intended meaning of words is different from their actual meaning. If you’re fluent in sarcasm, this might sound like the same thing.

Sarcasm is in fact a type of verbal irony, but whereas sarcasm only characterizes someone’s speech, irony can be found in words, situations, or circumstances.

The definition of irony as a literary device is a situation in which there is a contrast between expectation and reality. For example, the difference between what something appears to mean versus its literal meaning. Irony is associated with both tragedy and humor.

Irony is typically found in three forms: situational irony, verbal irony, and dramatic irony. Examples of Irony in Literature In Oedipus Rex, the audience knows that Oedipus is returning to his birthplace and marrying his mother which fulfills the Oracle’s prophecy, even though Oedipus and his.

Irony: Irony occurs in literature when the events of the story seem opposite to what would be expected. Characters' speech can also be ironic if they say the opposite of what they actually mean. Irony is typically difficult to clearly explain, especially as a literary device, since part of the point of its use is to be unclear.

According to the famous definition of irony given by Henry Watson Fowler in “The King’s English,” irony occurs when “ the surface meaning and the underlying meaning of what is said are not the same.”. Irony is a commonly used as a literary, rhetorical and comedic device, dating back to the works of Plato.

Oftentimes, irony is understood as the difference between what one says or does in relation to how these words and actions are understood. Evident in works of literature ranging from Shakespeare to comic books.

The first adult book Matilda reads is Great Expectations by Charles Dickens. Imagery Crunchem Hall is described using very dark imagery, in particular the torture device of the Chokey that Ms Trunchbull uses.

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Turner, Francis McDougall Charlewood. Element of irony in English literature. Irony is a means to humour. It is a rhetorical device used in most of the modern fiction and literature in general.

It is widely used in psychological literary works, for example, in James Joyce’s fiction. Irony is a disagreement or incongruity between what is said and what is understood, or what is expected and what actually occurs. Advertisement Irony is a key element of literature, yet defining it is certainly a challenge.

Though it can take many forms in fiction, it always calls for thinking double, with a gap between expectation and result. There’s often an element of the bizarre or quirky about the ironic – with odd juxtapositions, disparities, disjunctions.

Beyond Theory: Eighteenth-Century German Literature and the Poetics of Irony By Benjamin Bennett Cornell University Press, Read preview Overview Imperfect Sense: The Predicament of Milton's Irony By Victoria Silver Princeton University Press,   Green Book study guide contains a biography of Peter Farrelly, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

Irony has long been used as an element of literature. From the early days of Shakespeare to the current writings of Susan Minot, irony has been used to enhance and point out the contradictory elements to the fictional storyline while at the same time intriguing audiences and keeping their interest in the story.

Analyzing Irony in Literature Irony is the contrast between what is expected and what is real. Three primary types of irony in literature are situational, verbal, and dramatic. Situational Irony: When what happens is the opposite of what is expected.

Verbal Irony: A contrast between the intended meaning and the apparent or expected meaning. Print book: EnglishView all editions and formats: Rating: (not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first. Subjects: English literature -- History and criticism.

Irony in literature. English literature. More like this: Similar Items. Miller uses verbal irony in the exchange between Proctor and Parris in act 3 to highlight the growing tyranny in Salem during the trials.

Proctor’s sarcastic retort that “There might also be a dragon with five legs in my house, but no one has ever seen it” uses verbal irony to highlight his anger at what he sees to be corrupt and tyrannical practices.

Irony is the contrast between what is expected and what is real. Three primary types of irony in literature are situational, verbal, and dramatic. Situational Irony: When what happens is the opposite of what is expected.

Most of the examples in “The Lottery” fall into this category.Irony in literature (incl. poetry) can often be used in a humorous way in order to provoke the reader to think more about what is being said and to encourage the reader to think deeper about what is being implied.

Writers often use irony in order to engage the reader's attention and to .The edition of The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage states that “the looser use of irony and ironically, to mean an incongruous turn of events, is trite.

Not every coincidence, curiosity, oddity and paradox is an irony, even loosely.”.